Pumpkin seed extract

Pumpkin Seed Extract (Cucurbita pepo) 2 fl oz: HH

Pumpkin Seed Extract (Cucurbita pepo) 2 fl oz: HH

Pumpkin seed powder is delicious in salads, mixed with grains, or added to salad dressings, casseroles, soups, and baked goods. Pumpkin seed powder is traditional in Chinese medicine mixed with cold boiled water for oral administration. The 1997 Commission E on Phytotherapy and Herbal Substances of the German Federal Institute for Drugs recommends Pumpkin seed for 'Irritated bladder condition, micturition problems of benign prostatic hyperplasia stages 1 and 2.' 'Average daily dosage: 10 g of seed; equivalent preparations. Mode of Administration: Whole and coarsely ground seed and other galenical preparations for internal uses.' The unique chemistry of pumpkin seeds has been shown in double-blind trials to effectively reduce symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Trials in Thailand have shown that eating pumpkin seeds as a snack can help prevent the most common type of kidney stone, called a calcium oxalate stone. Pumpkin seeds appear to reduce levels of substances that promote stone formation in the urine and increase levels of substances that inhibit stone formation. Pumpkin seeds are quite safe for long-term consumption. Grieve's classic 'A Modern Herbal': 'The Four Greater Cold Seeds of the old materia medica were the seeds of the Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo), the Gourd (C. maxima), the Melon and the Cucumber. These were bruised and rubbed up with water to form an emulsion, which was much used in catarrhal affections, disorders of the bowels and urinary passages, fever, etc.' 'The seeds of both the Water Melon and the Common or Musk Melon are good vermicides, having much the same constituents as those of the PUMPKIN (sometimes known as the Melon Pumpkin), which have long been a popular worm remedy and in recent years have also been used for tapeworm.' 'Pumpkin seeds contain 30 per cent or more of a reddish, fixed oil, traces of a volatile oil, together with proteids, sugar, starch and an acrid resin, to which the anthelmintic properties appear to be due, though recent experiments have failed to isolate any substance of physiological activity, either from the kernels or shells of the seeds. The value of the drug is said to be due to its mechanical effect.' 'The seeds are employed when quite ripe and must not be used if more than a month old. A mixture is made by beating up 2 oz. of the seeds with as much sugar and milk or water added to make a pint, and this mixture is taken fasting, in three doses, one every two hours, castor oil being taken a few hours after the last dose. An infusion of the seeds, prepared by pouring a pint of boiling water on 1 oz. of seeds, has likewise been used in urinary complaints.' King's 1898 Dispensatory: 'Mucilaginous, taenicide [worm-killer], and diuretic, and of service in strangury and urinary affections, also in gastritis, enteritis, and febrile diseases. The infusion may be drank freely. The expressed oil of the pumpkin seeds, in doses of 6 to 12 drops, several times a